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Kerman


Kerman is a city in southeastern Iran with 677,650 inhabitants (2006), situated on a sandy plain 1749 metres above sea level. It is the capital of Kerman province with 2,652,413 inhabitants (2006) and an area of 181,714 km². Kerman is the largest carpet producing and exporting center in Iran as well as a large producer of pistachios on the world market. The province is rich in minerals, like copper, coal, chromium, lead, zinc, uranium and aluminum, but mining has remained on a small scale. In recent times crude oil has been discovered, but is yet not exploited.
Kerman is one of Iran’s oldest cities and has always been an important centre on the trans-Asian trade routes. Believed to have been founded in the early-3rd-century AD by Ardashir I, founder of the Sassanian dynasty, its history is a tale of prosperity and plunder, but not that much in the way of peace. From the 7th century Kerman was ruled in turn by the Arabs, Buyids, Seljuks, Turkmens and Mongols, and then until the Qajar dynasty by a further succession of invaders and regional despots. Kerman only gained security under the central government in Tehran during the 19th century.
Kerman’s continuity was its commerce, the evidence of which can still be seen in the many caravanserais around the bazaar. As trade moved more to the sea in the 16th century, so Kerman relied more on the production of carpets, a trade that remains

 

The origins of the citadel of Bam, Arg-e Bam, can be traced back to the Achaemenid period (6th to 4th centuries BC) and even beyond. The heyday of the citadel was from the 7th to 11th centuries, being at the crossroads of important trade routes and known for the production of silk and cotton garments. The citadel, which contains the governor’s quarters and the fortified residential area, forms the central focus of a vast cultural landscape, which is marked by a series of forts and citadels, now in ruins. Arg-e Bam is the most representative example of a fortified medieval town built in vernacular technique using mud layers (Chineh), sun-dried mud bricks (khesht), and vaulted and domed structures.

The Lut Desert is in the southeast of the Islamic Republic of Iran, an arid continental subtropical area notable for a rich variety of spectacular desert landforms.At 2,278,015 ha the area is large and is surrounded by a buffer zone of 1,794,134 ha.In the Persian language ‘Lut’ refers to bare land without water and devoid of vegetation.
The property is situated in an interior basin surrounded by mountains,so it is in a rain shadow coupled with high temperatures,the climate is hyperarid.
The region often experiences Earth’s highest land surface temperatures: a temperature of 70.7°C has been recorded within the property.